November Safety Tip - OSHA Training Requirements Made Easy

Submitted by Stephen Rodgers
                                               
At the risk of repeating myself - how many of you have been to the OSHA website?  How many of you know OSHA has a website?  The OSHA website has many resources that can make your jobs and lives so much easier. 
                                           
This month let’s talk about OSHA training requirements.  Buried within the pages of 29 CFR 1910, 1915, 1917, 1918, 1926, 1928, and 1960 are hundreds of training requirements.  Digging out the ones that apply to you can be very difficult and in many cases sleep inducing. 
                                           
Enter OSHA publication 2254 – 2015 Hot off the presses (so to speak).  This newly revised publication (www.osha.gov/Publications/osha2254.pdf) can be your lifesaver!
                                           
In case you are not sure of how to find this without the link, here is your step by step procedure.  Go here (www.osha.gov), select the Publications tab near the top of the page on the right side.  Select the letter T on the A thru Z listing.  The 13th entry under the letter T is your target.
                                           
I don’t know if you really want to print it (it’s 258 pages of color printing).  But I would defiantly save it on your computer.  I keep it on my desktop.
                                           
The table of contents is broken out by Part (1910, 1926, ect) and Subpart (A, B, ect) This makes finding the Subparts that apply to you a snap.  For example if worked for a construction company and I needed to know what my training requirements are under the new Confined Spaces in Construction (29 CFR 1926 Subpart AA) I would find it on page xi of the table of contents.  I would then turn to page 226.  That’s a little easier than pouring over the standard and hoping I found them all.  Now understand, you still have to read and understand the standard but at least now you know what OSHA expects.
                                           
One thing to remember, this publication only covers OSHA training requirements, not state, county, or city requirements.  Make sure you check the NRS/NAC, and county/city ordinances.
                                           
In general I would recommend checking the OSHA website, attending SCATS classes, and calling your local SCATS office whenever you have questions.  All three of these options only cost you your time, which is a great deal when you consider the alternatives.
                                           
For the answers to these and many other questions, or for a schedule of training courses offered at no charge by SCATS, call toll free 1.877.4SAFENV [1-(877)-472-3368], or visit, www.4safenv.state.nv.us.